on science

cat-organ-la-nature-1883-poyet1

 

We love science and absolutely everything that contributes to the field. Absolutely. Everything. Let us acknowledge that there are different measures of truth however, things for which fact-based modern science may have no place. So lets take a moment now and bow our heads to the 17th century German Jesuit scholar, pre-modern genius and Renaissance polymath Athanasius Kircher. In addition to his vast studies and writings on magnetism, optics, astronomy, hieroglyphics, alchemy, geology, music, and medicine, ‘THIS’ cares to remember him most as the builder of whimsical devices and one invention in particular: the cat organ (Katzzenklavier), in which a keyboard was rigged to the tails of cats of varying size to elicit different pitched and tonal meows. More detail? …(there was a series of spikes that connected the piano keys to the cat’s tails.)

June 12th, 2013

haircut degree zero

or, WHERE DOES THE 21st century’s 20/30 SOMETHING MOUSTACHED and/or BEARDED MAN STAND ?

…It is a fine physiognomy, which clearly displays all the signs of apostleship: a benign expression, a Franciscan haircut, a missionary’s beard, a Buddhists shaved head. Thus are united the marks of legend and those of modernity.

The haircut, for example, either the half shorn Franciscan, or the Buddhists, devoid of affectation and above all of definite shape, is without doubt trying to achieve a style completely outside of the bounds of art and even of technique, a sort of zero degree of haircut. One has to have one’s hair cut, of course: but at least, let this necessary operation imply no particular mode of existence: let it exist, but let it not be anything in particular. The Franciscan haircut, obviously devised so as to reach a neutral equilibrium between short hair (an indispensable convention if one does not want to be noticed) and unkempt hair (a state suitable to express contempt for other conventions), or the Buddhists, obviously devised with the thought of non-attachment to appearance, thus becomes the archetype of sainthood.

But at this point things get more complicated-because     (more…)

June 26th, 2011

notepad

we acquired this seemingly unassuming notepad from a typical stationers shop in a lonely desert india town. Though at the time we did not know what the hindi words meant, the notepad spoke to us nonetheless- it said, simply, “purchase me”.  Later lying in our offices silent for many years, we finally got around to asking someone what the hindi words meant, and it goes something like this:

I AM BUSINESSMAN
BUSINESS IS MY RELIGION
SHOP IS MY TEMPLE
CUSTOMER IS MY GOD
AND THE HARDWORK IS MY PRAYER
WHEN THE CUSTOMER SATISFIED IS MY PRASAD*

*food or offering given to a deity

March 1st, 2011

a cultural analysis via toiletries 101

cotton swab (American English)
cotton buds (British English)
ear bud (South African English)
baby gays (as named by the original inventor in the 1920’s Leo Gerstenzang)

February 1st, 2011

our patron saint

Apparently one morning in the late 18th century, American evangelist extraordinaire Jemima Wilkinson led a group of followers to a lakeshore. She preached to them on the powers of faith. As she built to a fiery conclusion, she proclaimed that she was going to walk on water …

“Have ye faith that I can do this thing?”
“Yea, we believe!”
… “Then there is no need for any vulgar spectacle.”

And with that she turned around, got into her carriage, and rode off.               (more…)

October 29th, 2010

about

We have nothing to say. We have nothing to say that has not been said. Despite the fact that we have nothing to say and we are saying it, we may have something to say at some other time. At some other time we will at that time post it here. Let it for now suffice to say that if and when we post we would wish to engage the reader with fruitless knowledge that one may not already be privilege to. Participation welcome.

April 5th, 2010